JK Rowling donates £15.3 million to MS and Parkinson’s clinic

The esteemed author JK Rowling has donated £15.3 million to support research into degenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s, MS and dementia, it has been revealed.

The Harry Potter creator said the multi-million-pound investment would be used to develop revolutionary new treatments at the University of Edinburgh’s Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic.

The research centre – named in memory of Ms Rowling’s late mother who died of multiple sclerosis at the age of 45 – was set up following a previous £10 million donation in 2010.

It has since been used to create a wide range of innovative and experimental treatments with the aim of bringing more clinical studies and trials to patients with conditions such as MS and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Commenting on the seismic donation, Ms Rowling said: “When the Anne Rowling Clinic was first founded, none of us could have predicted the incredible progress that would be made in the field of Regenerative Neurology, with the Clinic leading the charge.

“I am delighted to now support the Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic into a new phase of discovery and achievement, as it realises its ambition to create a legacy of better outcomes for generations of people with MS and non-MS neurodegenerative diseases.”

Professor Siddharthan Chandran, Director of The Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic, added: “Our research is shaped by listening to, and involving, individuals who are living with these tough conditions. The Anne Rowling Clinic’s vision is to offer everyone with MS or other neurodegenerative diseases, such as MND, the opportunity to participate in a suite of clinical studies and trials.”

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